Friday, June 16, 2017

Dorset and Thule Harpoon Head Update

Seven Dorset Harpoon Head reproductions.
They aren't all finished yet.
 I'm slowly wrapping up a set of 14 arctic harpoon head reproductions.  This is the most complete set of Dorset and Thule harpoon heads that I've ever attempted at one time, so I'm excited to see them all finished.  I've been working on the whole set at the same time and it's been tough keeping them all straight in my head.  On the other hand, it's an interesting opportunity to see first hand the similarities and differences over time and between the cultures.  

Seven Thule Inuit harpoon head reproductions.  All of the pieces are there, I just need to finish the details and do some assembly.
The full set, plus a Beothuk harpoon head (lower left) from a seperate order.

These four are more-or-less complete.  They may need a little bit of dry sanding and maybe one or two slight adjustments, but I don't need to cart them back and forth from the workshop with all the others for the time being.  Twelve o'clock is a Middle Dorset Kingait Closed harpoon head made from walrus ivory with a chert endblade.  Three o'clock is a Thule Type 2 harpoon head made from antler.  Six o'clock is a Middle Dorset Nanook Wasp Waist selfbladed harpoon head made from ivory.  Nine o'clock is a Late Dorset Type G harpoon head made from antler with a chert endblade.

Photo Credits: Tim Rast

3 comments:

  1. all of these are homemade? would you share process with me?

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    Replies
    1. Yes, these are all artifact reproduction made by hand. For this set, I'm using modern cutting and carving tools rather than traditional stone implements. I rely on rotary tools for a lot of the detail work, but use a variety of saws, sanders, wet wheels, and files along the way. If you look through this blog you will see examples of how I work.

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